DDR v. DDR2 v. DDR3

If you’ve ever looked into computer memory, you might’ve come across some weird acronyms. RAM, DRAM, SDRAM, DDR, DDR2, DDR3, and so on. You know they’re supposed to be the memory, but you don’t know the difference and now you’re just confused. Here’s a short bit on what you need to know about computer memory.


A DDR3, which stands for the third generation of double data rate that is used to store program code data. Out of the three options, it’s the one you’re better off getting. DDR3 is currently the most standard memory you can get for your computer memory or RAM, random access memory. To be more specific, DDR3 is the current standard for SDRAM, synchronous random-access memory.


Developed in the 1990s, SDRAM was developed to address the inadequacies of DRAM. DRAM was an asynchronous interface, which meant that it operated independently of the processor, which meant that it was slow. SDRAM streamlined the process by synchronizing the memory process to control inputs, so it could queue one process while waiting for another and therefore execute more tasks much more quickly. Eventually, SDRAM, which was operating via a single data rate interface was too slow and replaced with the DDR or double data rate. DDR could transfer data on both the rising and falling edges of the clock signal, operating at nearly twice the speed of the SDRAM. This leads the revelation that memory could run at a lower clock rate, use less energy, and achieve faster speeds.


Eventually, as processors became more powerful, DDR also became insufficient and by 2003, the DDR2 was introduced. Continued advancements in technology drove the demand for faster, more powerful processors and memory with DDR2. So, the cycle continued with DDR3 in 2007. In 2014, the DDR4 was introduced, and 2019 is expected to see the DDR5. Currently, DDR3 is the base standard, but with DDR5 on its way, that could change. Hopefully, now you know a bit more about memory and the acronyms make more sense. 


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